6 Ways to Deal with Disney Depression

6 Ways to Deal with Disney Depression

Note: “Disney Depression” is not the same as clinical depression. This post is not meant to diminish real depression in any way.

With the world in the midst of a pandemic, vacations and trips have been cancelled while most of us self isolate in our homes. Like most people, my partner and I had to cancel all of our travel plans for 2020. While we have some hope that 2021 may present a safe opportunity to travel at some point, that time is far in the future as of the writing of this post. After honeymooning at Disney in 2019, we had hoped to re-create that experience in 2020. Obviously it wasn’t possible once the virus took hold.

We’ve been feeling pretty down about not being able to go back to Disney World to be perfectly honest. I know it seems silly considering how much has happened this year, politically and otherwise, but I strongly feel that the disappointment in unfulfilled plans is valid. Most of our lives have stopped moving forward. Most of us are confined to our homes, working in a makeshift office, and only leaving the house for appointments and grocery shopping. It’s completely normal to mourn what “should have been.” In an effort to combat this Disney Depression, a term coined for the feelings you get leaving the most magical place on earth and the time between before you are there again, I came up with 6 different ways to deal with the Disney blues.

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How Doctor Who Helped Me Get Over a Break Up

How Doctor Who Helped Me Get Over a Break Up

A long, long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, I wrote a post about my abusive relationship on another blog. This blog has long since been deleted as well as the posts I wrote with it. I did copy over some of my posts to an external drive that I felt may be worth sharing again one day. This drama-filled, emotional personal story was one of the ones I have kept for years, unsure if I should edit it and re-share it or let it die. It was an extremely dark, abusive, and unhealthy time in my life from the age of about fifteen to twenty. Here I am at 27, almost 28, re-reading what I wrote several years ago, fresh from my break up.

Ever since I started my “Mental Health in the Geek Community” series, I have wanted to tell the story about how fandoms helped me through this horrible break up. I have stopped myself over and over again, fearful of what wounds would be re-opened or what drama or revealed secrets would befall me. I’ve been in therapy now for about 2 years, and I think it’s finally time that I share a bit of my story about how Doctor Who helped me heal and move on from an abusive teenage relationship.

Trigger Warning: I got into detail about the abuse I endured. It’s okay if you want to skip this post. I’ll see you in the next one.

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Top 10 Things Getting Me Through the Pandemic

Top 10 Things Getting Me Through the Pandemic

I can’t believe it’s been over 6 months since I started working from home and self isolating. So much has happened in those six months like getting a big job promotion and my husband and I buying our first home, and yet I’m still only leaving the house for necessities and the very rare special occasion restaurant meal. My mental health has rode the waves (and roller-coasters), ebbed and flowed during the past six months.

Lately, my mental health has been pretty crap, and it makes sense as my entire every day routine was ripped away: we had a house guest for longer than planned, most of my means of escape were eventually packed away, the entire home buying process was stressful… I could go on, but I won’t. Let’s move on to the entire purpose of this post: things that have actually been getting me through the past 6 months of self isolation, working from home, and the daily stresses that come with the ongoing pandemic.

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6 Ways I’m Coping with Self Isolation

6 Ways I’m Coping with Self Isolation

This post was requested by Michael as a part of the Patreon benefits of being a Hardcore Geek. You can request blog posts and YouTube videos by becoming a Hardcore Geek too! Check out my Patreon page for more information.

Most, if not all, of our lives have been turned upside down the past few weeks. I will be honest with y’all: I haven’t been dealing with the lock down all that well. It’s been a difficult three weeks, as I’m sure it has been for everyone else. I’ve been avoiding talking about the COVID19 pandemic, the lock down, and working from home on the blog. I’ve scattered a few thoughts in some recent YouTube videos, but I haven’t really sat with all of these changes and dealt with where my head and heart are until the weekend of April 4-5th.

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When Escapism Isn’t a Good Thing: 8 Ways to Make Escapism Healthy

When Escapism Isn’t a Good Thing: 8 Ways to Make Escapism Healthy

I want to begin by saying escapism itself isn’t unhealthy. It’s actually completely normal, and we all do it. It helps us from burning out more quickly than we would without it. It allows us to come back to an initially overwhelming problem with a better attitude about it. Escapism can allow us to reconnect with ourselves and things we care about as well like games, comics, and TV shows.

So when does escapism become a “bad” thing? If you find yourself ignoring or avoiding issues in your life, then you are on teetering on the edge of escapism becoming unhealthy. You are using your hobbies,  interests, and creative outlets as a way to not deal with whatever issues are going on in your life in that moment. Escapism is meant to be temporary. When is becomes a constant part of your life, escapism is no longer considered an escape.

Last year, I was inspired by Erin from Girly Geek Blog’s article on denial to write about my experience with escapism and how it isn’t always good for our mental health. People use escapism every day though books, music, television, games, comics, fandoms, etc. to distract ourselves from the stress and hardships of every day life. It’s a way to relax after a long day. It’s a way to escape into something else for just a little while. The real trick is how to come back after escaping for so long.

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